Question about Kodak DCS 5xx/6xx/7xx Batteries

Discuss older Nikon-based Kodak digital SLRs, including DCS 100, DCS 200, NC2000, DCS 400/600/700-series, etc. Ask questions, post general comments, anecdotes, reviews and user tips.
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NikonD1X
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Question about Kodak DCS 5xx/6xx/7xx Batteries

Post by NikonD1X » Wed Feb 17, 2016 8:28 pm

So far ist was no problem for me to replace the almost dead batteries/the block of a Kodak DCS4xx. Please have a look at the foto, my solution. OK, you have to open the DCS4xx body to load the 1,2 V Eneloopes separately, but I can live with that!

Image

Now I have a question about the DCS5xx/6xx/7xx batteries

I tried the Search-function but could not find, what I am looking for. Please check this foto:

Image

I am not sure if the charger is genuine Kodak, but it works. But in my opinion it was for the old NiCd/Ni-MH-batteries, especially the condition function. I can remember the problems with the old cells, bringing them back to life with a 9V battery.

I can load my fresh Li-ion batteries with this device, but how long should I load? I have no idea if the red, green, yellow LEDs work propper.

Any suggestions? Welcome every help! Thank You very much

My own experience

Power tips for Kodak DCS 600/700-series cameras on this site wrote:

"The original Kodak Professional Premium Plus battery is labeled 7.2 V, and according to Kodak "a fully charged Ni-MH battery should have a voltage between 8.2 to 8.7 V." (The rating on a pack is the 'nominal' voltage. That means, charge it up and let it sit for a day and then measure it."

My first experience with those hints for Ni-MH-batteries. Using the moderne 7,2 V Li-ion battery I started with 7,3 V with a Li-ion, left in the Kodak DCS620x. It needs 3 hours to bring the Li-ion battery from 7,3 to 8,7 V. Leaving that charged Li-ion one day out of camera (!), shows 8,3 V. After these 3 hours there is no sign of green LED... I think it works only with Ni-MH-batteries...

Ralf
From 7,3 V to 8,7 V 3 h charge
Last edited by NikonD1X on Sat Feb 20, 2016 9:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Stan Disbrow
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Re: Question about Kodak DCS 5xx/6xx/7xx Batteries

Post by Stan Disbrow » Sat Feb 20, 2016 2:23 am

Hi,

Well, the Li Ion pack ought to have its own control processor inside the pack. So, that will prevent the controller in the NiCd charger from operating properly. So, I expect the charger lights to not be correct.

It is a good thing the makers of the Li Ion pack seem to have properly compensated for the old charger. Usually Li Ion packs go -poof- when charged by old NiCd chargers.

Stan
Amateur Photographer
Professional Electronics Development Engineer

NikonD1X
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Re: Question about Kodak DCS 5xx/6xx/7xx Batteries

Post by NikonD1X » Sat Feb 20, 2016 8:00 am

Hi Stan

Thank you very much for your estimation! 

You wrote: "It is a good thing the makers of the Li Ion pack seem to have properly compensated for the old charger. Usually Li Ion packs go -poof- when charged by old NiCd chargers." 

I wonder that I never heard, red about a newer Kodak Charger especially for modern Li-ion batteries. Anyway, I will use my old charger further on, not watching the LEDs! Starting with something around 7,3 V and a charge-time of 3 h brings about 8,7 V. Checking this Li-ion 24 h later shows 8,2 to 8,3 V. And I can report, that the Li-ion battery never gets hot, even warm while charging on the old Kodak-device. Seems perfect!

Ralf

Stan Disbrow
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Joined: Fri May 20, 2005 7:33 pm
Location: Raleigh, NC USA

Re: Question about Kodak DCS 5xx/6xx/7xx Batteries

Post by Stan Disbrow » Sat Feb 20, 2016 1:34 pm

Hi,

Kodak never went with the tempermental Li Ion batteries, so there was never a charger for them. The early stick batts were NiCd, and used the flat top charger. The later ones were NiMh and used the slant top charger, which also handled the NiCd.

I prefer the NiCd chemistry with the older Kodak DSLRs because they have a better ability to supply the peak current the hybrids draw when the shots come fast. Of course, the NiCds do tend to run out with less warning than the NiMH do, but a spare battery or two fit nicely in a back pocket.

As far as the tempermental nature of Li Ion goes, reports of problems with them are in the news seemingly daily. Especially since some makers have seen fit to use great big ones in these hoverboards. They seem to go -poof- just sitting there.

But, there are plenty of laptops, tablets and phones reported to have gone -poof- out there. And, the USPS won't let you mail a Li Ion battery. NIMH and NiCD are still OK, though, when discharged.

Oh, and that is another point. When an Li Ion battery says it is discharged and the device shuts down due to that, it really is not fully discharged. It still has 20-25 percent charge remaining. This is because if you did fully discharge one, it would never charge up again. The Li Ion chemistry is quite different, and is more akin to a big fat capacitor than a battery. And that is why you can't mail one.

If you want to see some go -poof- there is a guy on YouTube who loves to stick cell phones into a blender. When you see the inside go all black, that is the Li Ion battery going -poof- from physical damage. But, any -poof- looks the same regardless of the cause...

Stan
Amateur Photographer
Professional Electronics Development Engineer

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