Pictures with the DCS420c, DCS200IR, and D1

Discuss older Nikon-based Kodak digital SLRs, including DCS 100, DCS 200, NC2000, DCS 400/600/700-series, etc. Ask questions, post general comments, anecdotes, reviews and user tips.
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Brian Sweeney
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Pictures with the DCS420c, DCS200IR, and D1

Post by Brian Sweeney » Sun May 22, 2005 4:25 pm

Some pictures with three of the cameras mentioned here. Using the DCS200ir requires some work, the DCS420c is "way-easier", and the Nikon D1 is a world apart.

BUT looking at some of the macro-shots taken hand-held at 1/30th and 1/60th, I am starting to believe that spinning disks gyro-stabilize the DCS420c and DCS200IR. Yet another advantage of old digital cameras...

http://www.dslrexchange.com/dslrxphotop ... ppuser/209


Just to show how the DCS200 got started...
http://rangefinderforum.com/forums/show ... php?t=5852

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DCS200IR

Post by Webmaster » Sun May 22, 2005 7:03 pm

You (or your company?) paid $16.000 for a DCS200IR in 1993? What did you use it for?

Suddenly my new Nikon D2X doesn't sound so expensive :D

Jarle

Brian Sweeney
Posts: 86
Joined: Sat May 21, 2005 1:30 pm

Post by Brian Sweeney » Mon May 23, 2005 9:37 am

As "wetware" recalls, the body alone was ~$12,500. Add in a Mass Storage "HitchHiker", quantum battery pack, SCSI adapter, and a few other support items and the price tag came to $16,400. This was the Infrared version, which required a custom run of the CCD's at Kodak. It was not a product when I called them the first time. The Army also expressed an interest, and Kodak called me back to say they were coming out with the CCD without the IR cutoff filter. I think (wetware) that the engineer told me they were doing a run of 50 CCD's.

At the time, I had worked with Digital Infrared Sensors since 1981. I wrote the software to read the data from 7-track (and later 28-track), magnetic tape, calibrate, display, and process it. Most of the software ran on a VAX 11/780 and Vax 11/750, but I also used some Z80a based CP/m machines for image processing. How about $49,000 for a 640x480 RAMTEK image processor? The Kodak was CHEAP compared to having 16-element detector arrays custom made for scanning MW (3-5um) and LW (9-12um) sensors in 1981. This was part of the Navy's BMAP (Background Measurements Analysis Program). We imaged all types of background scenes in Infrared for algorithm development.

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